Malted Mixed Grain Loaf for Remoska Tria

Preparation time: 15 minutes, plus 1 hour to rise

Cooking time: 30 minutes

Who would have thought that you could bake bread in the Remoska® Tria Electric Cooker? This loaf tastes amazing, a has just one rise to cut down on time and effort.

Ingredients

  • 500g mixed grain bread flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 sachet (7g) easy-blend yeast
  • 300ml lukewarm water
  • 1 tbsp barley malt extract
  • 2-3 drops vegetable oil
  • 1 tbsp mixed seeds

Instructions

  1. Place the lid with the window on top of the Remoska Tria pan, plug it in and switch it on for 5 minutes, then turn it off – you’ll be popping your bread dough in the pan to rise, and this will ensure it’s just the right temperature.
  2. In a large mixing bowl combine the flour and salt, then stir in the easy-blend yeast. Mix together the warm water and malt extract and add it to the flour, stirring it in with your hand. Bring the dough together to form a ball, then turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface.
  3. Knead the dough vigorously for 10 minutes, flouring the work surface when necessary – though avoid adding too much flour. This kneading and stretching develops the gluten, which helps your bread to rise well.
  4. Form the dough into a ball. Remove the lid from the Remoska Tria and lightly grease the base and sides with 2-3 drops of oil. Put the dough onto the middle of the base and replace the lid. Leave to rise for 1 hour.
  5. Remove the lid from the Remoska and very lightly brush the surface of the dough with cold water, then sprinkle the mixed seeds on top. Replace the lid and switch it on. Bake for 20 minutes, then set the lid to one side while you cover the loaf with a piece of foil to prevent the surface becoming too browned.  Replace the lid and bake for a further 10 minutes.
  6. When cooked, remove the lid and cool the loaf in the Remoska for 10 minutes before turning it out. Cool completely on a wire rack. Serve spread with butter.  

Tip: Remember that the water shouldn’t be too hot, or else it will kill the yeast – lukewarm is what you are aiming for.