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Madeleines

April 24, 2017

 

Madeleines, from Lucy Burton 

Lucy Burton is the baker and writer behind Pudding Lane Blog. Writing out of a tiny city kitchen in Brixton, South London, Lucy loves to bake with ingredients at the height of their season and at their most delicious.
Since training at Leiths School of Food and Wine, Lucy has worked as a recipe developer, food stylist and food PR. Lucy is all about simplicity, and believes there are few things worse than investing time and money in a complicated recipe that calls for hundreds of ingredients and doesn’t cut the mustard. Here, Lucy shares her secrets for success and debunks the myths surrounding some of 2017’s biggest baking trends. 

Lucy has kindly shared two Madeleine recipe and a handful of top tips so you can have a go at home!

The Madeleine is a classic. First conceived in 18th century France, these beautiful cake morsels are the epitome of elegance. A Madeleine is defined by its characteristic shape: a scalloped edge, a grooved golden underside and, of course, the humpback. 

It is not difficult to achieve a perfectly shaped cookie that is also light, moist and fluffy – rather, it’s all in the preparation. The Madeleine tin should be buttered, dusted with flour, the excess shaken away, and then placed in the freezer until you are ready to bake the madeleines. This will help to create the defined shape of the madeleines, and ensure that they don’t stick to the tin. 

The batter should also be rested for at least 30 minutes (and up to two hours, if possible) before being baked. This will help to create the right shape and texture during baking. 

Finally, the modern addition of baking powder facilitates that perfect humpback. It may make purist blood run cold, but the use of a raising agent will really help with the final shape.

 

ROSE AND PISTACHIO MADELEINES

DSC_1071THE INGREDIENTS
  • 2 eggs
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 100g plain flour
  • 1tsp baking powder
  • 100g butter, plus a little extra for greasing
  • 2-3 tsp rose water
  • 100g icing sugar
  • 75g unsalted pistachios 
 
THE RECIPE
  1. Melt a little butter, then brush a clean madeleine tin with it. Dust with flour, shake away any excess then put the tin in the freezer for 30 minutes. Preheat your oven to 200C.
  2. Melt 100g butter, then set aside to cool a little. Seperately, whisk your eggs and sugar together for 3-4 minutes, until pale, fluffy and thick. When you drag the whisk across the surface, ribbons should form. Pour in the cooled butter and 1 tsp rose water, and fold to mix. Sieve in the flour and baking powder, folding once more to combine. Leave the batter to stand for 20 minutes.
  3. Spoon 2 tsp of mixture into the frozen moulds, ensuring they are no more than half-full. Bake for 9-11 minutes – the madeleines need to rise a little in the middle, and be golden around the edges. Transfer the madeleines to a wire rack to cool. 
  4. Mix the remaining rose water and icing sugar with a tsp of water, adding a little pink colouring if you like. Dip the cooled madeleines into the icing, and sprinkle with crushed pistachios. Enjoy with strong coffee and people you love. 

 

LEMON AND THYME MADELEINES

DSC_3353 THE INGREDIENTS
  • 2 eggs
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 100g plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 100g butter, plus extra for greasing
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • 100g icing sugar
 
THE RECIPE
  1. Melt a little butter, then brush a clean madeleine tin with it. Dust with flour, shake away any excess then put the tin in the freezer for 30 minutes. Preheat your oven to 200C.
  2. Melt 100g butter, then set aside to cool a little. Separately, whisk your eggs and sugar together for 3-4 minutes, until pale, fluffy and thick. When you drag the whisk across the surface, ribbons should form. Add the cooled butter, the zest of the lemon and half of the thyme, and fold to mix. Sieve in the flour and baking powder, folding once more to combine. Leave the batter to stand for 20 minutes.
  3. Spoon 2 tsp of mixture into the frozen moulds, ensuring they are no more than half-full. Bake for 9-11 minutes – the madeleines need to rise a little in the middle, and be golden around the edges. Transfer the madeleines to a wire rack to cool.
  4. For the glaze, mix the icing sugar with enough lemon juice to form a thin icing. Dip the cooled madeleines into the icing, then sprinkle with a little fresh thyme. Madeleines are best eaten on the day they are baked.
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